Law Technology Award

Law Technology Award

Most innovative use of technology during a trial

William Smith and R. J. Waldsmith, Abramson Smith Waldsmith. Ted Brooks, consultant.

Court technology runs the gamut from basic video presentation systems to complex evidentiary systems and multimedia options. Lawyers now use trial technology to present case facts, to highlight inconsistencies in testimony, and to help the fact finder understand the issues.

The attorneys of Abramson Smith Waldsmith, with consultant Ted Brooks, used many of the more common options available in a courtroom. Their technology use stands out, however, for how they used technology prior to the trial to maximize results at trial.

Video depositions were used extensively in a complex personal injury case. Challenged by the difficulty of telling their client's story, William Smith and R.J. Waldsmith used video to bring clarity to an otherwise confusing case. The goal: visual reinforcement during the trial to help the jury to see what they were hearing about.

The firm went beyond showing static images. They replayed a witness' deposition testimony, juxtaposed against the witness' courtroom testimony, to heighten the effect of the impeachment by plaintiff's counsel.

Not only was this a clear, easy to understand way to deliver the information, but using multi­media appealed to the jury and kept their focus.

Waldsmith and Smith also used video during their closing arguments, to reinforce their case and the testimony that had been presented. They used technology to keep witnesses who normally would have departed once their role in the case was over in front of the jury from the start of the trial to the finish.